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Connecticut Judgment Laws

This article summarizes certain Connecticut judgment-related laws, which are part of the Connecticut Annotated General Statutes and Code Series, sometimes abbreviated as ANN. My articles are my opinions, and not legal advice. I am a judgment broker, and am not a lawyer. If you ever need any legal advice or a strategy to use, please contact a lawyer. Laws change over time, so please confirm any laws mentioned in this, or any of my articles.

37-3A (General Statues) - Rates recoverable as damages. Search on the web for "Connecticut 37-3A interest" to see the full text of this law, or any Connecticut (CT) laws mentioned in this article. This law specifies that CT judgments earn an interest rate of ten percent per year. Although not specified, I am confident the judgment interest rate in CT is simple and non-compounded. When judgments are domesticated into CT, the original state's judgment interest rate applies.

52-350E (Chapter 906) - Service of process. Search on the web for "52-350E (Chapter 906)" to see the full text of this law. This law specifies the way post-judgment procedure paperwork must be served by an authorized person, on parties by certified mail, return receipt requested, to their last known address; or served with proper personal service. This law does not apply to service of contempt-related proceedings.

52-350F (Chapter 906) - Enforcement of money judgments. Costs, fees and interest. Search on the web for "52-350F (Chapter 906)" to see the full text of this law. This law specifies that all of the judgment debtor's non-exempt property may be recovered, by execution or by foreclosure of a real property lien, for the total amount owed on the judgment including allowable costs and interest.

52-351A (Chapter 906) - Notice of enforcement action to be given to judgment debtors. Search on the web for "52-351A (Chapter 906)" to see the full text of this law. This law seems to apply to judgment debtor notices on bank levies only, because it states "other than a wage execution or property execution". On bank levies, it states that when a third party garnishee gets served, a copy of what was served must also be served on the judgment debtor at their last-known address by first class mail.

52-351B (Chapter 906) - Discovery for judgment creditors. Search on the web for "52-351B (Chapter 906)" to see the full text of this law. This law specifies how judgment creditors may perform post judgment discovery. CT post-judgment discovery must start with interrogatories served on the judgment debtor, which must be returned to the judgment creditor within 30 days. If the interrogatories are not completed and returned, the judgment creditor may then ask the court for supplemental discovery orders, with contempt orders possible for those who do not comply with court orders.

52-353 (Chapter 906) - Execution on wages after judgment. Search on the web for "52-353 (Chapter 906)" to see the full text of this law. This law specifies that judgment debtors get a chance to successfully pay their judgment with an installment plan first. If they fail to pay, the judgment creditor can buy a writ of execution for $75 from the court, and that cost gets added to the judgment debt. The court then issues a wage execution levy, and gives it to the levying officer, who then serves it on the judgment debtor's employer. Notice of everything then gets served on the judgment debtor.

CT execution writs must be used within 12 months or they expire, and must be returned if the judgment is satisfied. Wage levies are limited to 25%, and can be thwarted by debtor exemption laws or pre-existing wage levies. Child support, and certain other kinds of liens, and even union dues; can outrank and can push aside regular civil judgment levies. Employers cannot punish or fire levied employees, and not even VIPs can avoid judgment creditor wage levies.

52-361A (Chapter 906) - Notification of judgment debtor rights. Claim for exemption or modification. Search on the web for "52-361A (Chapter 906)" to see the full text of this law. This law specifies the way notices are sent to all parties in post judgment proceedings. Every levy action requires a notice of it to be served on the judgment debtor, with the pertinent information, possible exemptions, how to pay by installments to stop the levy, and a reminder that the judgment debtor might be able to vacate the judgment. This law restricts wage levies to 25% of the employee's weekly disposable earnings. This law also details the use of interrogatories, and how hearings for exemptions and other claims are handled and scheduled.

52-361B (Chapter 906) - Notification of judgment debtor rights. Claim for exemption or modification. Search on the web for "52-361B (Chapter 906)" to see the full text of this law. This law is very similar to 52-361A above.

52-367B (Chapter 906) - Execution against debtors and financial institutions. Judgment debtor must be natural persons. Search on the web for "52-367B (Chapter 906)" to see the full text of this law. This law specifies the way levies get executed on judgment debtor's bank accounts. The court charges judgment creditors $75 for a writ of execution. The law describes in a complex way, the requirements that all parties, especially banks, must follow; and the way notices must be served on the judgment debtor. Also specified, is the way that subpoenaed bank records may be ordered and paid for by the judgment creditor.

If you need to find a judgment collection lawyer in Connecticut, contact a judgment broker, or visit the Connecticut Bar Association web site at: www.ctbar.org.


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